Hope for Weeding Experience

“One of the worst mistakes you can make as a gardener is to think you’re in charge.” –Janet Gillespie

This summer has been one with a lot of window daydreaming. I had an asthma flare-up. Simple, basic activities of normal life would leave me exhausted and out of breath. We are not sure as to what aggravated my asthma. It could have been a bacterial infection or even the thunderstorms that came through the previous weekend. In storms with strong wind, pollen can be stirred up and broken into tiny particles. Those particles can get lodged into the tiny bronchioles in the lungs. So for almost a month, my outdoor activities were limited. Add heat and humidity into the mix meant going outside only at a necessity.

God took over the tending of my garden. The plants have grown but so have the weeds. I finally got some energy back for a little maintenance in the garden. Twenty minutes later, energy gone for a while. Sitting on a step stool and pulling weeds by hand from one row. No using the cultivator to quickly rid the pathways of weeds.

Now my garden has a different issue NO RAIN! It has been over a month (same time as I got sick, mid-June) since we have had measurable rainfall. So I have been using my sprinkler every few days to water the garden. In the afternoon the dry dirt cracks reappear. It isn’t the same as a good day (or night) of rain. I have some produce on the plants yeah!- waiting for more from the flower blooms.

I am not in charge of plant growth, God is. I can help provide extra water. I can help provide extra food, by means of fertilizer. However, He is the one who provides the plants with the ability to grow and produce. We just need to sit back sometimes and have faith that He will.

(Side note, I wrote this last week but this week was Vacation Bible School at my church & I was the director of it. No time to post this.)

How Do You Winterize Your Garden Plot?

“Gardening imparts an organic perspective on the passage of time.” –William Cowper

Fall is in full swing and winter is coming around the corner. The vegetable garden has stopped producing and the frost has killed off the remaining flowers. Time to think about how your garden is going to rest for a few months.

First off, how do you store your garden supplies? I stack my tomato cages together in groups of 5 or 6 of like sizes. Then I put them in front of my wood shed. Ideally, they would be stored out of the weather but I don’t have extra space to spare. My fence isn’t a permanent one. So with help from my boys, we pull up the stakes and roll the fencing up . I put it next to my cages – keeping all supplies together.

Secondly, is to clean the garden plot. Some people will pull up all the plants & weeds and put them in a compost bin. I don’t do this. Instead, I pull up the vegetable plants and leave them on the ground. We use the garden plot to burn our leaves that have fallen on that side of the yard. Burning the garden plot is beneficial for it too. Any diseases from that growing season would be killed. The ash of organic matter is added back into the soil as potash. This aids in balancing the pH value of the soil, helps with flowering & fruit growth, and is a pest deterrent for slugs and snails.

Thirdly, is to til the garden. This will mix in the added nutrients from the leaves and ash. It will loosen any remaining roots from the plants and weeds. Also, tilling will add more pathways in the soil where more air & water can penetrate and be stored.

The fourth step to winterizing the garden is to add mulch, compost, manure, or ground cover. Basically a layer of something to prevent additional weeds from taking over. This year, we have the opportunity to have a way to get some horse manure from a friend’s farm. This manure contains a great source of nutrients for the soil to absorb as it breaks down over the winter months.

A time for rest isn’t a new practice. God started it in the very beginning. The Bible tells us he created for six days and then took a rest. It was not because he was tired. It was to show us to have faith that he will take care of things while you rest. Just because you aren’t working the topside of the garden, it doesn’t mean things aren’t happening in the soil underneath. So be obedient and rest your garden and yourself for a season.